Book review: Command and Valour

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If your view of history comes via the lens of Hollywood (and I know that Armourer readers are more discerning than that) then you’d be forgiven for thinking that D-Day was an American operation and that it was all over on 6 June.

Author: Stuart Robertson

Reviewed by: Duncan Evans 

 

Buy your copy here.

 

If your view of history comes via the lens of Hollywood (and I know that Armourer readers are more discerning than that) then you’d be forgiven for thinking that D-Day was an American operation and that it was all over on 6 June. Those are two of the misconceptions that Stuart Robinson aims to set straight with this large, well illustrated and glossy production. In fact, 62% of land forces were British and Canadian, while 85% of the naval vessels were supplied by the Royal Navy.

It starts with a quick look at the Victoria Cross and the Medal of Honour because in between the story of the operations and fighting in the bocage are interspersed 21 stories of how the highest award for bravery was won by Allied troops.

There are maps, photos (some of which are excellent) and a compelling and well argued conclusion which both berates the Americanisation of the battle for Normandy and supports Monty’s handling of it. There’s even a chapter on touring the battlefield. It all makes for a well-told account that rebuffs American self-aggrandisement.

 

• Sabrestorm Publishing

 

• ISBN 978-1-7812-2011-5

 

• 204 pages • Hardback • £25

 

 

As reviewed in The Armourer July 2019

 

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