Book review: Cromwell and his women

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16 April 2019
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In the 17th century, the role of women was to find themselves a husband, produce children and help run the household.

Author: JULIAN WHITEHEAD

Reviewed by: Duncan Evans 

 

Buy your copy here.

 

In the 17th century, the role of women was to find themselves a husband, produce children and help run the household. For the nobility, there were leisure persuits such as riding, needlework, music and socialising, but in all cases they deferred to the male of the household. Julian Whitehead’s book looks at the life of Oliver Cromwell and the roles of the women in his life. Their influence was significant as his mother lived with him for many years and his children were all girls.

 

The narrative tells the story of how Cromwell rose to prominence, how Charles I was defeated, but then how Parliament tried to thwart his ambitions for a God-fearing country. In one dramatic episode, Cromwell denounces MPs in Parliament, has musketeers drag them all out, then locks the doors. While all the political and military activity is taking place, the roles and functions of his wife and children in keeping his household going are explored.

 

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Buy your copy here.

• Pen & Sword

• 246 pages • Hardback • £19.99

 

As reviewed in The Armourer May 2019.

 

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